• 1

    Donnon T, Paoluccici EO, Violata C: The predictive validity of the MCAT for medical school performance and medical board licensing examinations: a meta-analysis of the published research. .Acad Med 82::100. ,2007. .

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Evans P, Wen FK: Does the medical school admission test predict global academic performance in osteopathic medical school?. J Am Osteopath Assoc 107::157. ,2007. .

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3

    Mitchell KJ: Traditional predictors of performance in medical school. .Acad Med 65::149. ,1990. .

  • 4

    Hall FR, Bailey BA: Correlating students’ undergraduate science GPAs, their MCAT scores and the academic caliber of undergraduate colleges with first-year academic performances across five classes at Dartmouth medical school. .Acad Med 67::121. ,1992. .

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Nowacek GA, Pullen E, Short J, et al: Validity of CAT scores as predictors of preclinical grades and NBME part 1 examination scores. .J Med Educ 62::989. ,1987. .

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6

    Wiley A, Koenig JA: The validity of the medical college admission test for predicting performance in the first two years of medical school. .Acad Med 71::83. ,1996.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Dixon D: Relation between variables of preadmission, medical school performance, and CPMLEX-USA levels 1 and 2 performance. .J Am Osteopath Assoc 102::332. ,2004. .

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8

    Dixon D: Correlation of preadmission variables with medical school performance and level 1 COMLEX-USA scores. .J Am Osteopath Assoc 102::510. ,2002. .

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Admissions updates and facts about osteopathic medical education. Available at: http://www.aacom.org/about/fastfacts/Pages/default.aspx. Accessed November 1. ,2008. .

  • 10

    American Association of College of Podiatric Medicine Applicant statistics. Available at: http://www.aacpm.org. Accessed November 2. ,2008. .

Admission Characteristics and Academic Performance of Podiatric and Osteopathic Medical Students at Des Moines University

View More View Less
  • 1 College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University, Des Moines, IA. Dr. Comstock is now with DePaul Health Center, Bridgeton, MO.
  • | 2 College of Health Sciences, Des Moines University, Des Moines, IA.
Restricted access

Background: Podiatric and osteopathic medical students at Des Moines University take the same basic science medical curriculum. The first course students complete is medical biochemistry. The final common course is the second-year medical pharmacology course. Attrition typically occurs between these academic offerings. We sought to compare admissions data, retention rates, and academic performance between these two groups of medical students for the classes of 2008 to 2011.

Methods: Average admission scores, performance scores for the biochemistry and medical pharmacology courses, and retention rates for the 2008 to 2011 classes were obtained from the registrar and enrollment offices. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare the scores of the two cohorts. Linear regression was used to identify changes across time.

Results: The DO students showed significantly better performance than the DPM students in matriculating overall and science grade point averages, total Medical College Admissions Test scores, retention rates, and the medical biochemistry course (P < .01). There was no difference in the performance of the student groups in the medical pharmacology course. The DPM student scores across the four classes increased for both academic courses, whereas the DO student scores remained at the same level for medical biochemistry, at a rate of 0.74% per year (R2 = 0.50), and pharmacology, at a rate of 0.90% per year (R2 = 0.49).

Conclusions: Admissions data and initial academic performance of osteopathic medical students were higher than those of podiatric medical students. Once attrition occurred in year 1, the difference in academic performance between these groups of students was no longer statistically significant, and students in both medical programs at that time in the curriculum are equally academically qualified. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 100(4): 276–280, 2010)

Corresponding author: Robert M. Yoho, DPM, MS, College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University, 3200 Grand Ave, Des Moines, IA 50312. (E-mail: robert.yoho@dmu.edu)