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Debridement of the Noninfected Wound

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  • 1 Department of Plastic Surgery, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.
  • | 2 Department of Podiatric Surgery, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.
  • | 3 The Center for Wound Healing, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC.
  • | 4 Division of Wound Healing, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC; Department of Plastic & Orthopedic Surgery, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.
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The utility of wound debridement has expanded to include the management of all chronic wounds, even in the absence of infection and gross necrosis. Biofilms, metalloproteases on the wound base, and senescent cells at the wound edge irreversibly change the physiologic features of wound healing and contribute to a pathologic, chronic inflammatory environment. The objective of this review is to provide surgeons with a basic understanding of the processes of debridement in the noninfected wound. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 100(5): 353–359, 2010)

Corresponding author: Christopher E. Attinger, MD, The Center for Wound Healing, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, Main Building, 1st Floor, Washington, DC 20007. (E-mail: cattinger@aol.com)