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Central Talar Dome Lesions

A Unique Surgical Approach with Incorporation of a Talar Allograft for Joint Reconstitution and Restoration of Function

Bruce M. Dobbs Serramonte Podiatry Group, Daly City, CA.

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Shawn M. Cazzell Podiatric Surgery, St. Mary’s Medical Center, San Francisco, CA.

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Monara Dini Podiatric Surgery, St. Mary’s Medical Center, San Francisco, CA.

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Osteochondral lesions of the talus have been documented, reported, and studied since as early as the 19th century. The evolution of classification systems has allowed surgeons to better manage osseous lesions. Most osteochondral lesions of the talus have been categorized as anterolateral, posteromedial, or central with respect to the talar dome and its articulating surface. The complexity of the aforementioned lesions each present their own set of obstacles and, hence, management. Specifically, surgery on a central talar dome lesion is complicated by poor exposure and limited access, proving to be a challenging operation. Preoperative planning, including exhaustive imaging before any talar dome surgery, is imperative. We present a case study that involves the need for a distal tibial chevron (wedge) talus, with incorporation of a cadaveric allograft to fill the defect. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 101(2): 192–195, 2011)

Corresponding author: Bruce M. Dobbs, DPM, Serramonte Podiatry Group, 901 Campus Dr, #311, Daly City, CA 94015. (E-mail: jbldobbs@pacbell.net)