• 1.

    Qureshi, K, RR Gershon, MF Sherman, et al. :Health care workers’ ability and willingness to report to duty during catastrophic disasters. .J Urban Health 82::378. ,2005. .

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Gershon, RR, LA Magda, KA Qureshi, et al. :Factors associated with the ability and willingness of essential workers to report to duty during a pandemic. .J Occup Environ Med 52::995. ,2010. .

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Glotzer, DL and WJ Psoter. :Disasters and the surge environment. .J Emerg Manag 4::47. ,2006. .

  • 4.

    Glotzer, DL, S Margolies, ED Rekow, et al. :A Modest Proposal, Helping to Meet the Surge Environment in a Disaster. ,Nova Science Publishers Inc. ,Hauppauge, NY. ,2008. .

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Levy, LA. :Natural and man-made disasters: where is podiatric medicine? JAPMA 96::378. ,2006. .

  • 6.

    Helfand, AE. :Integrating strategies for podiatric public health, clinical services, and education. .JAPMA 89::427. ,1999. .

  • 7.

    Psoter, WJ, MC Alfano, and ED Rekow. :Meeting a disaster’s medical surge demand: can dentists help? J Calif Dent Assoc 32::694. ,2004. .

  • 8.

    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality :Altered Standards of Care in Mass Casualty Events: Bioterrorism and Other Public Health Emergencies. ,Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. ,Rockville, MD. ,2005. . AHRQ publication 05-0043.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response :Pandemic and All Hazards Preparedness Act .Available at: http://www.phe.gov/preparedness/legal/PAHPA/Pages/default.aspx. .Accessed January 22, 2011.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Public Act 094-0733 .Available at: http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/fulltextasp?Name=094-0733. .Accessed January 28, 2010.

  • 11.

    Glotzer, DL, FG More, J Phelan, et al. :Introducing a senior course on catastrophe preparedness into the dental school curriculum. .J Dent Educ 70::225. ,2006. .

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Psoter, WJ, N Herman, FG More, et al. :Proposed educational objectives for hospital-based dentists during catastrophic events and disaster response. .J Dent Educ 70::835. ,2006. .

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Glotzer, DL, ED Rekow, FG More, et al. :All hazards training: incorporating a catastrophe preparedness mindset into the dental school curriculum and professional practice. .Dent Clin N Am 51::805. ,2007. .

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Glotzer, DL, A Rinchiuso, ED Rekow, et al. :The Medical Reserve Corps: an opportunity for dentists to serve. .N Y State Dent J 72::60. ,2006. .

  • 15.

    Fernandez, JB, DL Glotzer, MM Triola, et al. :A unique role for dental school faculty: telephone triage training and integration into a health departments’ emergency response planning. .Am J Disaster Med 3::141. ,2008. .

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Podiatric Medicine and Disaster Response

A Survey of the Professional Leadership

Walter Psoter DDS, PhD1, David L. Glotzer DDS2, Linda S. Baek BS1, Rajiv Karloopia DDS, MS1, and Douglas E. Morse DDS, SM, PhD1
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY.
  • | 2 Department of Cariology and Operative Dentistry, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY
Restricted access

Background:

We surveyed the podiatric medicine professional and academic leadership concerning podiatric medicine professionals as disaster surge responders.

Methods:

All US podiatric medical school deans and state society presidents were mailed a self-administered structured questionnaire. The leaders were asked to complete the questionnaire and return it by mail; two repeated mailings were made. Descriptive statistics were produced, and differences between deans and society presidents were tested by the Fisher exact test.

Results:

The response rate was 100% for the deans and 53% for the society presidents. All of the respondents agreed that podiatric physicians have skills applicable to catastrophe response, are ethically obligated to help, and should receive additional training in catastrophe response. Deans and society presidents agreed with the statements that podiatric physicians should provide basic first aid and place sutures, obtain medical histories, and assist with maintaining infection control. With one exception, all of the society presidents and deans agreed that with additional training, podiatric physicians could interpret radiographs, start intravenous lines, conduct mass casualty triage, manage a point of distribution, prescribe medications, and provide counseling to the worried well. There was variability in responses across the sources for training.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that deliberations regarding academic competencies at the podiatric medical school level and continuing education should be conducted by the profession for a surge response role, including prevention, response, mitigation, and recovery activities. After coordination and integration with response agencies, podiatric medicine has a role in strengthening the nation’s catastrophic event surge response. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 103(1): 87–93, 2013)

Corresponding author: Walter Psoter, DDS, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, New York University College of Dentistry, 250 Park Ave S, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10003. (E-mail: wp9@nyu.edu)