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    Cubicin [prescribing information], Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc, Lexington, MA, 2010.

Daptomycin for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Diabetic Foot Infections

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  • 1 Roxborough Memorial Hospital, Philadelphia, PA.
  • | 2 Health Center Kutenhausen, Minden, Germany.
  • | 3 Casa di Cura Villa Berica, Vicenza, Italy.
  • | 4 Departments of Medical Affairs and Biostatistics, Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc, Lexington, MA.
  • | 5 Global Medical Affairs and HEOR, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland.
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Background

Diabetic foot infection (DFI) is a serious, difficult-to-treat infection, especially when caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Vancomycin has been the standard treatment for MRSA infection, but lower response rates in MRSA skin infections have been reported. This analysis assessed the outcome and safety of daptomycin therapy in patients with a DFI caused by MRSA.

Methods

Using the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience and the European Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (2006–2009), 79 patients with MRSA DFI were identified and included in this analysis.

Results

In the 74 evaluable patients, daptomycin was administered at a median dose of 4.8 mg/kg primarily every 24 hours (85.1%) and for a median of 15.0 days. Overall, 77.0% of the patients (57 of 74) received initial therapy with activity against MRSA; however, of patients receiving daptomycin as second-line therapy (n = 31), only 45.2% were treated with an antibiotic agent active against MRSA. The overall clinical success and treatment failure rates were 89.2% and 10.8%, respectively. Success with daptomycin therapy was higher in patients who had surgery and in those whose initial therapy was daptomycin. Eleven patients had 14 adverse events, two of which were possibly related to daptomycin use and led to discontinuation.

Conclusions

In a large real-world cohort of patients with MRSA DFI, daptomycin therapy was shown to be generally well tolerated and effective. The use of an anti-MRSA antibiotic agent should be considered when implementing first-line antibiotic drug therapy for DFI in countries where MRSA is common to avoid inappropriate empirical treatment and potential negative effects on outcomes.

Corresponding author: Kenneth C. Lamp, PharmD, Medical Affairs, Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc, 65 Hayden Ave, Lexington, MA 02421. (E-mail: Kenneth.Lamp@cubist.com)