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Musculoskeletal Pain, Job Satisfaction, Depression, and Anxiety Among Spanish Podiatric Physicians

Marta Elena Losa Iglesias Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

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Ricardo Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo Escuela Universitaria de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

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Background

There is a high prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints related to day-to-day work among podiatric physicians. We sought to determine the relationships among musculoskeletal pain, job satisfaction, depression, and anxiety in Spanish podiatric physicians.

Methods

A convenience sample of 421 Spanish podiatric physicians was administered a survey that included questions about sociodemographic variables, musculoskeletal pain, job satisfaction, depression, and anxiety.

Results

On average, respondents were found to have a high level of pain, a moderate level of job satisfaction, and low-to-moderate levels of depression and anxiety. Young single women had the highest levels of pain and anxiety. Analysis with the Student t test indicated significant differences between the sexes for levels of pain (P < .0001) and anxiety (P < .014). Job satisfaction was inversely related to depression and anxiety.

Conclusions

These findings, particularly the increased levels of pain, job dissatisfaction, anxiety, and depression in young single female podiatrists, indicate a need for strategies to reduce the risks posed by the work environment in podiatric medicine, thus minimizing the negative psychological and physical consequences of participating in the profession.

Corresponding author: Marta Elena Losa Iglesias, PhD, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Avda. Atenas s/n-Alcorcón, 28922-Madrid, Spain. (E-mail: marta.losa@urjc.es)