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Plantar Fasciitis and Its Relationship with Hallux Limitus

Yolanda Aranda Department of Podiatry, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.

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Pedro V. Munuera Department of Podiatry, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.

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Background

We sought to determine whether patients with plantar fasciitis have limited dorsiflexion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint and which type of foot, pronated or supinated, is most frequently associated with plantar fasciitis.

Methods

The 100 study participants (34 men and 66 women) were divided into two groups: patients with plantar fasciitis and controls. The Foot Posture Index and dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint were compared between the two groups, and a correlation analysis was conducted to study their relationship.

Results

In the plantar fasciitis group there was a slight limitation of dorsiflexion of the hallux that was not present in the control group (P < .001). Hallux dorsiflexion and the Foot Posture Index were inversely correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient, −0.441; P < .01).

Conclusions

Participants with plantar fasciitis presented less hallux dorsiflexion than those in the control group, and their most common foot type was the pronated foot.

Corresponding author: Pedro V. Munuera, DPM, Department of Podiatry, University of Seville, C/ Avicena, s/n, Seville, 41008, Spain. (E-mail: pmunuera@us.es)