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Description of Total Population Hospital Admissions for Morton's Metatarsalgia in Australia

Reza Naraghi University of Western Australia, School of Surgery, Podiatric Medicine Unit, Crawley, Western Australia.

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Alan Bryant University of Western Australia, School of Surgery, Podiatric Medicine Unit, Crawley, Western Australia.

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Linda Slack-Smith University of Western Australia, School of Dentistry, Crawley, Western Australia.

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Background

Morton's metatarsalgia is a painful perineural fibroma of a plantar nerve, most commonly of the second or third intermetatarsal spaces of the forefoot. The aim of this study was to investigate hospital admissions with a diagnosis of Morton's metatarsalgia in the Australian population from 1998 to 2008.

Methods

Data regarding admissions with a diagnosis code of ICD-10 G57.6 were extracted from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare databases of hospital morbidity from 1998 to 2008. The event of interest was an admission with ICD-10 G57.6 (Morton's metatarsalgia). The explanatory variables included sex and age group. Rates were calculated using the estimated resident population counts to determine denominators.

Results

Morton's metatarsalgia admissions were almost three-fold higher for women in the population compared to men. The rate of admissions for Morton's metatarsalgia was the highest for the total population in the 55- to 59-year-old age group. Among women admitted for Morton's metatarsalgia, the highest rate was in the 50- to 54-year-old age group; among men, the highest rate was in the slightly older 55- to 59-year-old age category.

Conclusions

Population-level information on admissions for Morton's metatarsalgia show that admissions were three times higher among women compared to men. The highest admission rate was in the 50- to 55-year-old age group.

Corresponding author: Reza Naraghi, DPM, University of Western Australia, School of Surgery, Podiatric Medicine Unit M422, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia. (E-mail: reza.naraghi@uwa.edu.au)