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An Assessment of Hallux Limitus in University Basketball Players Compared with Noncompetitive Individuals

Paul Trégouët Centre Audomarois de Recherche Biomécanique, 22 rue des Epeers, 62500 Saint Omer, France. (E-mail: paul.tregouet@gmail.com)

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Background

Injuries of the first metatarsophalangeal joint have lately been receiving attention from researchers owing to the important functions of this joint. However, most of the studies of turf toe injuries have focused on sports played on artificial turf.

Methods

This study compared the range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint in collegiate basketball players (n = 123) and noncompetitive individuals (n = 123).

Results

A statistically significant difference (P < .001) in range of motion was found between the two groups. The difference between the two sample means was 21.35°.

Conclusions

With hallux rigidus being a potential sequela of repeated turf toe injuries, it seems likely that subacute turf toe injuries occur in basketball players, leading to degenerative changes that result in hallux limitus.