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Podiatric Medical Abnormalities in a Random Population Sample 40 Years or Older in Spain

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  • 1 Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, As Xubias de Arriba, 84, A Coruña, Spain.
  • | 2 Health Sciences Department, Universidade de A Coruña, Ferrol, Spain.
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Background

Podiatric medical abnormalities are highly prevalent, yet few random population studies exist that determine the presence of pathologic abnormalities in the feet, despite their importance. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of podiatric medical abnormalities in a random sample population 40 years or older.

Methods

An observational study was conducted of a random sample population (n = 1,002) located in A Coruña, Spain. Anthropometric variables, comorbidity (Charlson score), quality of life (36-item Short-Form Health Survey), and podiatric medical examination findings were studied. A descriptive analysis and multivariate logistic regression were performed.

Results

The most common diseases were claw toes (69.7%), hallux valgus (38%), and hallux extensus (15.8%), which increased with age and female sex. The most frequent metatarsal formula was index minus (40.9%), followed by index plus minus (35.0%). The most frequent digital formula was Egyptian foot (57.1%), followed by Greek foot (31.4%). In this study, although the presence of podiatric medical abnormalities reduced the probability of enjoying a better quality of life, it did not do so significantly. After taking into account age, sex, comorbidity, body mass index (BMI), and the presence of podiatric medical abnormalities, the variables with an independent effect that modified the physical component of quality of life were sex (female), comorbidity, and BMI.

Conclusions

There was a high prevalence of podiatric medical abnormalities, which increased with age and female sex. Comorbidity, BMI, and sex modified quality of life independently of podiatric medical abnormalities.

Corresponding author: Salvador Pita-Fernandez, MD, PhD, Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, SERGAS, As Xubias de Arriba, 84, A Coruña, A Coruña 15006, Spain. (E-mail: salvador.pita.fernandez@sergas.es)