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Foot Type Analysis Based on Electronic Pedobarography Data in Individuals with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type During Upright Standing

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  • 1 Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy.
  • | 2 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Division, Orthopaedic Department, Umberto I Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.
  • | 3 Department of Mechanical, Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
  • | 4 Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) “San Raffaele Pisana,” Tosinvest Sanità, Roma, Italy.
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Background

Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a rheumatologic condition characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal findings related to congenital laxity of connective tissue. Because foot pain and other foot problems are reported to make daily life problematic to manage for individuals with JHS/EDS-HT, and thanks to the availability of modern technology, the aim of the present study was to quantitatively characterize foot type in individuals with JHS/EDS-HT during upright standing.

Methods

Forty feet of 20 women with JHS/EDS-HT (mean ± SD age, 36.03 ± 14.01 years) were assessed clinically and with a pressure-sensitive mat during upright standing.

Results

Forty-five percent of feet had a high arch (pes cavus), 27.5% had a normal arch, and 27.5% had a low arch (pes planus or flatfoot).

Conclusions

From a clinical perspective, the characterization of foot type in JHS/EDS-HT is important to identify, develop, and enhance the rehabilitative options. An understanding of the relationship between pes cavus and foot pain in these patients could, in fact, improve the clinical management of these patients.

Corresponding author: Veronica Cimolin, PhD, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milano, 21054, Italy. (E-mail: veronica.cimolin@polimi.it)