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Healing Efficacy and Participant Outcomes of Chemical Matrixectomies Using a Hydrogel Containing Oakin

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  • 1 Jackson North Hospital, Miami Shores, FL.
  • | 2 Barry University, Miami Shores, FL.
  • | 3 Private Practice, Sarasota, FL.
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Background

We sought to demonstrate the healing efficacy of an antimicrobial hydrogel containing Oakin, an oak extract, to heal postoperative partial and total chemical matrixectomies.

Methods

Sixty participants were eligible for this open-label prospective study by having an ingrown toenail and a willingness to have the ingrown portion of the nail or the entire toenail permanently removed. All of the participants underwent a similar nail surgery, were provided a postoperative kit that included the study hydrogel, and received the same sheet of instructions for aftercare.

Results

Fifty-four participants could be contacted for follow-up and final evaluation; 54% (n = 29) were men and 46% (n = 25) were women. Eighty-nine partial hallux nail avulsions with phenol matrixectomy were performed. The median ± SD time to healing was 7.00 ± 0.00 days for 80% of participants (n =  43) and 8.85 ± 4.15 days for 98% (n = 53). An analysis of variance showed that the proportion healed time trend is significant (F 1,53 = 79.265; P < .001).

Conclusions

The study hydrogel's ability to stop phenol's caustic activity is clinically beneficial in phenol matrixectomy aftercare. Providing each participant with a kit that included the same dressing supplies yielded consistent aftercare outcomes and 98% patient satisfaction (n = 53). The findings show that the Oakin-containing hydrogel was efficacious in healing phenol matrixectomies without the need for soaking. Furthermore, we suggest that the study hydrogel could also reduce healing times.

Corresponding author: Kristina N. Barreiro, DPM, Barry University, School of Podiatric Medicine, 11300 NE 2nd Ave, Miami Shores, FL 33161-6695. (E-mail: kristina.barreiro@mymail.barry.edu)