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Complications of Sodium Hydroxide Chemical Matrixectomy

Nail Dystrophy, Allodynia, Hyperalgesia

Seher Bostancınull

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Pelin Koçyiğitnull

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Hilayda Karakök Güngörnull

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Nehir Parlaknull

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Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Dr. Celal Ertuğ Etimesgut State Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Corresponding author: Seher Bostancı, MD, Ankara Universitesi Tıp Fakültesi, İbni Sina Hastanesi, Deri ve Zührevi Hastalıklar ABD, 06100 Ankara, Turkey. (E-mail: sbostanci@msn.com)