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Components of an Evidence-Based Analytic Rubric for Use in Medical School Admissions

Graham P. Shaw School of Podiatric Medicine, Barry University, Miami Shores, FL.

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Jonathan Coffman Saba University, The Bottom, Saba, Dutch Antilles. Dr. Coffman is now with Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, FL.

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Attrition from medical school remains a serious cause of concern for the medical education community. Thus, there is a need to improve our ability to select only those candidates who will succeed at medical school from many highly qualified and motivated applicants. This can be achieved, in part, by reducing the reliance on cognitive factors and increasing the use of noncognitive character traits in high-stakes admissions decisions. Herein we describe an analytic rubric that combines research-derived predictors of medical school success to generate a composite score for use in admissions decisions. The analytic rubric as described herein represents a significant step toward evidenced-based admissions that will facilitate a more consistent and transparent qualitative evaluation of medical school applicants beyond their grades and Medical College Admissions Test scores and contribute to a redesigned and improved admissions process.

Corresponding author: Graham P. Shaw, PhD, School of Podiatric Medicine, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave, Miami Shores, FL 33161. (E-mail: gshaw@barry.edu)