• 1

    Mahlen SD : Serratia infections: from military experiments to current practice. Clin Microbiol Rev 24: 755, 2011.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Gaughran ER: From superstition to science: the history of a bacterium. Trans N Y Acad Sci 31: 3, 1969.

  • 3

    Breed RS, Breed ME: The type species of the genus Serratia, commonly known as Bacillus prodigiosus. J Bacteriol 9: 545, 1924.

  • 4

    Yu VL : Serratia marcescens: historical perspective and clinical review. N Engl J Med 300: 887, 1979.

  • 5

    Merlino CP: Bartolomeo Bizio's letter to the most eminent priest, Angelo Bellani, concerning the phenomenon of the red colored polenta. J Bacteriol 9: 527, 1924.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6

    Chi SY, Kim TO, Park CW, et al: Bacterial pathogens of ventilator associated pneumonia in a tertiary referral hospital. Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) 73: 32, 2012.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Tan N, Galvante PRE, Chee SP: Endogenous Serratia marcescens endophthalmitis: an atypical presentation. Eye (Lond) 28: 108, 2014.

  • 8

    Crowder JG, Gikley GA, White AC: Serratia marcescens bacteremia. Arch Intern Med 128: 247, 1971.

  • 9

    Cope TE, Cope W, Beaumont DM: A case of necrotising fasciitis caused by Serratia marsescens: extreme age as functional immunosuppression? Age Ageing 42: 266, 2013.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Montanaro D, Grasso GM, Annino I, et al: Epidemiological and bacteriological investigation of Serratia marcescens epidemic in a nursery and in a neonatal intensive care unit. J Hyg (Lond) 93: 67, 1984.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Cooper CL, Wiseman M, Brunham R: Bullous cellulitis caused by Serratia marcescens. Int J Infect Dis 3: 36, 1998.

  • 12

    Curtis CE, Chock S, Henderson T, et al: A fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens. Am Surg 7: 228, 2005.

  • 13

    Bonner MJ, Meharg JG Jr: Primary cellulitis due to Serratia marcescens. JAMA 250: 2348, 1983.

  • 14

    Langrock M, Linde H, Landthaler M, et al: Leg ulcers and abscesses caused by Serratia marcescens. Eur J Dermatol 18: 705, 2008.

    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15

    Carlesimo M, Pennica A, Musianese M, et al: Multiple skin ulcers due to Serratia marcescens in an immunocompetent patient. G Ital Dermatol Venereol 149: 367, 2014.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16

    de Vries JJ, Baas WH, van der Ploeg K, et al: Outbreak of Serratia marcescens colonization and infection traced to a healthcare worker with long-term carriage on the hands. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 27: 1153, 2006.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17

    Blossom D, Noble-Wang J, Su J, et al: Multistate outbreak of Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections caused by contamination of prefilled heparin and isotonic sodium chloride solution syringes. Arch Intern Med 169: 1705, 2009.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18

    Hertle R: The family of Serratia type pore forming toxins. Curr Protein Pept Sci 6: 313, 2005.

  • 19

    Puvanendran R, Huey J, Pasupathy S: Necrotizing fasciitis. Can Fam Physician 55: 981, 2009.

  • 20

    Busch B, Ahern M, Topinka M, et al: Eschar with cellulitis as a clinical predictor in community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin abscess. J Emerg Med 38: 563, 2010.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21

    Diaz J: The global epidemiology, syndromic classification, management, and prevention of spider bites. Am J Trop Med Hyg 71: 239, 2004.

  • 22

    Lipsky B, Berendt AR, Cornia PB, et al: 2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections. Clin Infect Dis 54: 132, 2012.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Lower-Extremity Infections Caused by Serratia marcescens

A Report of Three Cases and a Literature Review

Luis Marin DPM1, Raymond Rowan DPM, MS2, Ana Mantilla DPM1, Bamidele Olupona DPM, MPH1, and Ann MacIntyre DO3
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Podiatry, Palmetto General Hospital, Hialeah, FL. Dr. Rowan is now with the Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Bethesda Health, Boynton Beach, FL and David L. Smythe Wound Care Center, Martin Health System, Stuart, FL. Dr. Mantilla is now with the Ankle and Foot Centeres of Tampa Bay, Tampa, FL. Dr. Olupona is now with the Coral Gables Podiatry Center, Miami, FL.
  • | 2 Department of Podiatry, Certified Foot and Ankle Specialists, Palm City, FL. Dr. Rowan is now with the Department of Podiatry, Palmetto General Hospital, Hialeah, FL.
  • | 3 Department of Infectious Diseases, Palmetto General Hospital, Hialeah, FL.
Restricted access

Serratia marcescens is a ubiquitous, facultatively anaerobic, gram-negative bacillus that has been cited to cause infection in immunocompromised populations. In the literature, S marcescens infections of the lower extremity have presented as granulomatous ulceration, abscess, bullous cellulitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. Herein we present a series of three cases of lower-extremity infections in which S marcescens was the sole or a contributing pathogen. We discuss the commonalities of these three cases as well as with those previously cited. All three patients presented with some combination of a similar set of clinical characteristics, including bullae formation, liquefactive necrosis, and black necrotic eschar. All three patients were diabetic and had peripheral vascular disease.

Corresponding author: Raymond Rowan, DPM, MS, Department of Podiatry, Certified Foot & Ankle Specialists, 2664 SW Immanuel Dr, Palm City, FL 34990. (E-mail: DrRRowan@yahoo.com)