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Angioleiomyoma of the Lower Leg

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  • 1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
  • | 2 Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
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Angioleiomyomas are benign tumefactions that originate from smooth muscle in vascular structures and are difficult to definitively diagnose preoperatively. Although these lesions are rarely encountered in the foot, the lower extremity is the most common site of occurrence. An angioleiomyoma typically manifests as a small, painful, solitary, mobile lesion. This case report describes a lateral retromalleolar para–Achilles tendon insertional location for a moderately sized immobile solid tumefaction in the subcutaneous tissues. The lesion was nonpainful and progressively enlarged over 5 years. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the nodular lesion was subsequently diagnosed histopathologically as an angioleiomyoma. Owing to the ambiguous nature of the clinical findings, angioleiomyoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of lower-extremity soft-tissue manifestations.

Corresponding author: Robert L. B. Sprinkle III, DPM, MPH, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157. (rsprinkl@wakehealth.edu)