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Evaluating Quality of Life in Patients with Hallux Abducto Valgus Deformity After a Taping Technique

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  • 1 Department of Health, Valletta, Malta.
  • | 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
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Background:

The aim of this study was to determine the quality of life in patients living with hallux abducto valgus deformity before and after a taping technique.

Methods:

This study used a time series, quasi-experimental, same-subject design. Thirty-five patients with hallux abducto valgus were recruited in this study. Nonelastic zinc oxide tape was applied for 4 weeks. The Foot Health Status Questionnaire was used to assess the quality of life of participants before and after the intervention. The paired samples t test was used to test for statistical significance at the 95% confidence level.

Results:

In this study, a statistical reduction was seen in foot pain, foot function, and general foot health (P < .0001) after applying the nonelastic zinc oxide tape for 10 hours daily for 4 weeks. No statistically significant difference was found in the remaining domains of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire, although a difference in mean scores was observed.

Conclusions:

Treatment with nonelastic zinc oxide tape led to improved management of hallux abducto valgus and better quality of life; it is a safe, easy-to-use method with minimal adverse effects. Future studies should evaluate this method using larger sample groups and longer treatment periods while comparing this method with alternative treatment approaches, such as exercise or orthotic devices.

Corresponding author: Cynthia Formosa, PhD, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta, Tal-Qroqq, Msida, Malta. (E-mail: Cynthia.formosa@um.edu.mt)