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Differences in Faculty and Standardized Patient Scores on Professionalism for Second-Year Podiatric Medical Students During a Standardized Simulated Patient Encounter

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  • 1 Department of Podiatric Medicine, College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University, Des Moines, IA.
  • | 2 Department of Research, College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University, Des Moines, IA.
  • | 3 College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University, Des Moines, IA. Dr. Anwar is now with St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville, FL. Dr. Hagenbucher is now with Legacy Health, Portland, OR.
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Background:

This study examined the differences between faculty and trained standardized patient (SP) evaluations on student professionalism during a second-year podiatric medicine standardized simulated patient encounter.

Methods:

Forty-nine second-year podiatric medicine students were evaluated for their professionalism behavior. Eleven SPs performed an assessment in real-time, and one faculty member performed a secondary assessment after observing a videotape of the encounter. Five domains were chosen for evaluation from a validated professionalism assessment tool.

Results:

Significant differences were identified in the professionalism domains of “build a relationship” (P = .008), “gather information” (P = .001), and share information (P = .002), where the faculty scored the students higher than the SP for 24.5%, 18.9%, and 26.5% of the cases, respectively. In addition, the faculty scores were higher than the SP scores in all of the “gather information” subdomains; however, the difference in scores was significant only in the “question appropriately” (P = .001) and “listen and clarify” (P = .003) subdomains.

Conclusions:

This study showed that professionalism scores for second-year podiatric medical students during a simulated patient encounter varied significantly between faculty and SPs. Further consideration needs to be given to determine the source of these differences.

Corresponding author: James M. Mahoney, DPM, College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University, 3200 Grand Ave, Des Moines, IA 50312-4198. (E-mail: james.mahoney@dmu.edu)