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Retained Wooden Foreign Body in the Second Metatarsal

Ahmed Abdelbaki Bridgeport Hospital, Yale New Haven Health System, Bridgeport, CT.

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Sadaf Assani Bridgeport Hospital, Yale New Haven Health System, Bridgeport, CT.

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Neeraj Bhatt Bridgeport Hospital, Yale New Haven Health System, Bridgeport, CT.

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Ian Karol Bridgeport Hospital, Yale New Haven Health System, Bridgeport, CT.

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Alan Feldman Bridgeport Hospital, Yale New Haven Health System, Bridgeport, CT.

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The foot is considered the second most common location for foreign bodies. The most common foreign bodies include needles, metal, glass, wood, and plastic. Although metallic foreign bodies are readily seen on plain film radiographs, radiolucent bodies such as wood are visualized poorly, if at all. Although plain radiography is known to be ineffective for demonstrating radiolucent foreign bodies, it is often the first imaging modality used. In such cases, complete surgical extraction cannot be guaranteed, and other imaging modalities should be considered. We present a case of a retained toothpick of the second metatarsal in a young male patient who presented with pain in the right foot of a few weeks' duration. Plain radiography showed an oval cyst at the base of the second metatarsal of the right foot. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a toothpick penetrating the second metatarsal. The patient recalled stepping on a toothpick 8 years previously. Surgical exploration revealed a 2-cm toothpick embedded inside the second metatarsal.

Corresponding author: Ahmed Abdelbaki, MD, Bridgeport Hospital, Yale New Haven Health System, 1700 Broadbridge Ave, B12, Stratford, CT 06614. (E-mail: a.baki@aol.com)
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