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Use of Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allografts in More Than 100 Patients with Six Major Types of Refractory Nonhealing Wounds

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  • 1 Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
  • | 2 Foot and Ankle Institute, Oak Lawn, IL.
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Background:

Biochemical properties of the amniotic membrane help modulate inflammation and enhance soft-tissue healing. In controlled trials, the efficacy of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) allografts has been established. Our purpose is to describe our experience with using dHACM to treat nonhealing wounds of various etiologies.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective review of deidentified data from 117 consecutive patients treated in an outpatient clinic with dHACM allografts with wounds of various etiologies over 2 years. The decision to use advanced wound-care treatments is based on rate of healing observed after initiation of standard wound care and patient risk factors. Eligibility for treatments such as amniotic membrane allografts includes wounds without 50% reduction after 4 weeks, or earlier in patients deemed to be at high risk for nonhealing or with a history of chronic wounds. In micronized or sheet formulation, dHACM is applied to the wound weekly after sharp/mechanical debridement as necessary, and wound-care practices appropriate for wound type and location are continued.

Results:

Thirty-four percent of allograft recipients had diabetic foot ulcers, 25% had venous leg ulcers, 20% had surgical wounds, 14% had pressure ulcers, 6% had ischemic wounds, and 2% had traumatic wounds. Complete healing occurred in 91.1% of treated patients, with a mean ± SD number of weekly applications per healed wound of 5.1 ± 4.2.

Conclusions:

In addition to wounds of diabetic origin, dHACM can significantly expedite healing in refractory wounds of varying etiologies.

Corresponding author: Matthew Garoufalis, DPM, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, 820 S Damen Ave, Chicago, IL 60612. (E-mail: mggaro@aol.com)