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Comparison of Hallux Rigidus Surgical Treatment Outcomes Between Active Duty and Non–Active Duty Populations

A Retrospective Review

Marc D. Jones Mann-Grandstaff VA Medical Center, Spokane, WA.

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Kerry J. Sweet Surgery/Podiatry Service, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Lakewood, WA.

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Background:

Our aim in this study was to compare the long-term outcomes of three different surgical procedures for the treatment of hallux rigidus (ie, cheilectomy, decompressive osteotomy, and arthrodesis) between active duty military and non–active duty patients.

Methods:

A retrospective review of 80 patients (95 feet) undergoing surgical treatment for hallux rigidus was performed. Telephone survey was used to obtain postoperative outcome measures and subjective satisfaction. Additional data recorded and analyzed included age, sex, status of patient (active duty or non–active duty), grade of hallux rigidus, surgical procedure performed, date of surgery, time to return to full activity, ability to return to full duty, and follow-up time postoperatively.

Results:

The decompressive osteotomy group had the highest return-to-duty rate, satisfaction rate, and Maryland Foot Scores of all three surgical groups, although these differences were not statistically significant. Active duty and non–active duty patients did not have statistically significant differences in outcomes measures (ie, time to return to full activity, ability to return to full duty, satisfaction, or postoperative Maryland Foot Score) in any of the three surgical groups.

Conclusions:

Decompressive osteotomy, cheilectomy, and first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis are all reliable and effective procedures for treatment of hallux rigidus in both active duty military and non–active duty patients. Active duty military personal have a high rate of returning to their prior military activities after surgical treatment of hallux rigidus.

Corresponding author: Marc D. Jones, DPM, Mann-Grandstaff VA Medical Center, 4815 N Assembly, Spokane, WA 99205. (E-mail: marc.jones@va.gov)