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Fulminant Septicemia from Aeromonas hydrophilia in a Nonmobile Diabetic Patient

A Case Report

Sara E. Lewis DeKalb Medical Center and The Podiatry Institute, Decatur, GA. Dr. Lewis is now with the Southeast Permanente Medical Group, Atlanta, GA.

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Devin W. Collins Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Columbus, GA. Dr. Collins is now with Jack Hughston Memorial Hospital, Phenix City, AL.

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Adam M. Bressler DeKalb Medical Center and Infectious Disease Specialists of Atlanta, Decatur, GA.

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We report an unusual case of Aeromonas hydrophilia septicemia in a nonmobile diabetic patient secondary to contaminated well water used for bathing with a portal of entry through chronic forefoot and heel ulcers. To date, there are no documented cases similar to this patient's presentation. Aeromonas hydrophilia is commonly distributed among aquatic environments and tends to be found during warmer months. It is a rare cause of disease but can be life threatening and deadly, as in our case, in immunocompromised individuals. As podiatric physicians, we must remain diligent and have a high index of suspicion to identify patients at risk for this rare but serious infection and administer treatment aggressively to limit morbidity and mortality.

Corresponding author: Sara E. Lewis, DPM, Southeast Permanente Medical Group, 3495 Piedmont Rd NE, Ste 9, Atlanta, GA 30305. (E-mail: saralewis8289@gmail.com)