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It's Not Your Father's Podiatry School

Advances in Podiatric Medical Education

Jeffrey C. Page DPM1 and Denise Freeman DPM, MSE2
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  • 1 Associate Dean, College of Health Sciences, Director and Professor, Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ.
  • | 2 Associate Director and Professor, Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ.
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This paper discusses the innovative changes in podiatric medical education found in today's schools and colleges of podiatric medicine, including changes in philosophy, resources and technology, curriculum, delivery methods, the role of faculty, and assessment tools, and the changing expectations of the students themselves. There is an emphasis on the shift from a teacher-centered approach to professional education to a student-centered approach. Technological advances have had a tremendous impact on the educational process and have opened doors to many new forms of educational delivery that better meet the needs of today's students. We believe that the podiatric medical education of today is the equivalent of allopathic and osteopathic education in quality and depth. The future holds the promise of many more exciting changes to come.

Corresponding author: Jeffrey C. Page, DPM, Associate Dean, College of Health Sciences, Director and Professor, Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine, Midwestern University, 19555 N 59th Ave, Glendale, AZ 85308. (E-mail: jpagex@midwestern.edu)