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A Review of the Effect of Lower-Extremity Pathology on Automobile Driving Function

Andrew J. Meyr Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

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Laura E. Sansosti Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

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The effect of lower-extremity pathology and surgical intervention on automobile driving function has been a topic of contemporary interest in the medical literature. The objective of this review was to summarize the topic of driving function in the setting of lower-extremity impairment. Included studies involved lower-extremity immobilization devices, elective and traumatic lower-limb surgery, chronic musculoskeletal pathology, and diabetes as it relates to the foot and ankle, focusing on the effect each may have on driving function. We also discuss the basic US state regulations with respect to impaired driving and changes to automobile structure that can be made in the setting of lower-extremity pathology.

Corresponding author: Andrew J. Meyr, DPM, Department of Podiatric Surgery, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, 8th at Race Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107. (E-mail: ajmeyr@gmail.com)