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A Rare Case of Myonecrosis with Soft-Tissue Emphysema in a Diabetic Foot Caused by Streptococcus anginosus Isolated in Pure Culture: A Case Study

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  • 1 Sisters of Charity Hospital, Buffalo, NY.
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Streptococcus anginosus (SAG) is a known human pathogen and member of the Streptococcus milleri group. SAG is a known bacterial cause of soft-tissue abscesses and bacteremia and is an increasingly prevalent pathogen in infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We describe a rare case of SAG as an infectious agent in a case of nonclostridial myonecrosis with soft-tissue emphysema. This is the only case found in the literature of SAG cultured as a pure isolate in this type of infection and was associated with a prolonged course of treatment in an otherwise healthy patient.

Corresponding author: Jack Route, DPM, Sisters of Charity Hospital, 2157 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14214 (E-mail: Jackroute7@gmail.com)