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Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva and Its Implications in Podiatric Medicine: A Case Report

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  • 1 Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group, Mountain View, CA.
  • | 2 California School of Podiatric Medicine, Oakland, CA.
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The purpose of this case report is to show the clinical presentation of a rare genetic disorder, called fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, on the development of the foot in a newborn. Shortened great toes and malformations of the first metatarsals are present in all affected individuals at birth. Irreversible heterotopic endochondral ossification of soft tissues occurs in the first decade of life, often resulting in permanent immobility by the third decade of life. Trauma caused by surgical excision of nodules, dental procedures, or injections can further exacerbate this condition. Early diagnosis is imperative for these patients to prevent irreversible damage that may result from unnecessary invasive interventions. This case report presents a boy aged 2 years 3 months who was born with bilateral bunion deformity. The goal is to raise awareness of this disorder in the podiatric community, especially for those who work with pediatric patients.

Corresponding author: Nicholas Bolognini, DPM, Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group, 701 E El Camino Real, Mountain View, CA 94040. (E-mail: bolognn@pamf.org)