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The Two-Component Implant for Interphalangeal Fusion in Toe Deformities

Adem Şahin
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Esat Uygur
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Engin Eceviz
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Background

Although Kirschner wire implantation is popular for treating toe deformities, complications frequently occur. To prevent pin-tract infection and difficult Kirschner wire extraction, several implants have been developed to improve treatment outcomes.

Methods

Patients who had undergone an interphalangeal fusion by two-component implant for the treatment of toe deformities were included. Thirty-one toes of 21 patients were evaluated retrospectively. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) forefoot scores were used in clinical evaluation.

Results

The mean operation duration per toe was 16.4 min (range, 13–26 min). The average AOFAS forefoot score was 42.76 (range, 23–57) preoperatively and 88.76 (range, 70–95) at 34.4 months (range, 26–46 months) after surgery. Mean follow-up was 14.8 months (range, 12–19 months). Compared with before surgery, the AOFAS score was increased significantly after surgery (P = .03 by t test). Three minor complications were encountered. In one patient an infection was observed. After the implants were removed (first month) she was treated successfully by debridement and antibiotic agents and, finally, Kirschner wire placement. The second patient had a fissure fracture at the proximal phalanx, but routine follow-up did not change. In the third patient, the locking mechanism had become loose (detected on day 1 radiography); it was remounted under fluoroscopy without opening the wound. No patients had a cutout, loss of alignment, recurrence, or persistent swelling.

Conclusions

Outcomes of arthrodesis using the two-component implant were found to be safe and reliable, especially for hammer toe and fifth toe deformities.

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Kanuni Sultan Süleyman Training and Research Hospital, Küçükçekmece, Istanbul, Turkey.

Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Istanbul Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Kartal Lütfi Kırdar Training and Research Hospital, Kartal, Istanbul, Turkey.

Corresponding author: Esat Uygur, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Istanbul Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Research Hospital, Egitim Mah Doktor Erkin Cad, Istanbul, 34732, Turkey. (E-mail: esatuygur@gmail.com)