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Do Plantar Pressure and Loading Patterns Vary with Joint Hypermobility in Young Females?

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Background

Joint hypermobility is a connective tissue disorder that increases joint range of motion. Plantar pressure and foot loading patterns may change with joint hypermobility. We aimed to analyze static plantar pressure in young females with and without joint hypermobility.

Methods

Joint laxity in 27 young females was assessed cross sectionally using the Beighton and Horan Joint Mobility Index. Participants were divided into the hypermobility (score, 4–9) and no hypermobility (score, 0–3) groups according to their scores. Static plantar pressure and forces were recorded using a pedobarographic mat system.

Results

Higher peak pressures (P = .01) and peak pressure gradients (P = .025) were observed in the nondominant foot in the hypermobility group. According to the comparison of dominant and nondominant feet in each group, the hypermobility group showed significantly higher peak pressures (P = .046), peak pressure gradients (P = .041), and total force values (P = .028) in the nondominant foot.

Conclusions

The plantar pressure and loading patterns vary in young females with joint hypermobility. Evaluation of plantar loading as an injury prevention tool in individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome can be suggested.

Department of Sports Medicine, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. Dr. Torgutalp is now with Gaziler Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Dr. Babayeva is now with Azerbaijan National Institute of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baku, Azerbaijan.

Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Unit, Hacettepe University, Beytepe Hospital, 06800, Ankara, Turkey. Dr. Yilmaz is now with Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Yalova University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Yalova, Turkey.

Corresponding author: Şerife Şeyma Torgutalp, MD, Gaziler Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Training and Research Hospital, 06800, Ankara, Turkey. (E-mail: seymatorgutalp@gmail.com)