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Effects of Masai Barefoot Technology Footwear Compared with Barefoot and Oxford Footwear on Gait

Sevgi Özdinç PhD, MSN and Enis Uluçam MD
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Background

Shoes, with their biomechanical features, affect the human body and function as clothing that protects the foot. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Masai Barefoot Technology (MBT) shoes on gait in healthy, young individuals compared with bare feet and classic stable shoes.

Methods

The study was conducted in 67 healthy females aged 18 to 30 years. All volunteers walked barefoot, in Oxford shoes, and in MBT shoes and were evaluated in the same session. Kinematic gait analyses were performed. The three performances were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance to study the variance in the groups themselves, and the Friedman and Wilcoxon paired two-sample tests were used for the intragroup comparisons.

Results

We found that the single support time and the swing phase ratio increased during walking in MBT shoes compared with walking in stable shoes, whereas the double support ratio, stride length, cadence, gait speed, loading response ratio, and preswing phase ratio decreased. However, it was found that the step and stride length, step width, and gait speed increased and the preswing phase extended during walking in stable shoes compared with walking barefoot.

Conclusions

These results support the hypothesis that MBT shoes facilitate foot cycles as they reduce the loading response and the preswing and stance phase ratios.

Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Division, Healthy Science Faculty, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey.

Anatomy Division, Medical Faculty, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey.

Corresponding author: Sevgi Özdinç, PhD, MSN, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Division, Healthy Science Faculty, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey. (E-mail: sevgiozdinc@yahoo.com)