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Wound Management of a Pediatric Spina Bifida Patient Secondary to a Canine-Inflicted Fifth-Digit Amputation: A Case Report

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We present a case of a pediatric patient with a history of spina bifida who presented to the emergency department of a large Army medical treatment facility with a partially amputated right fifth digit she sustained while sleeping with the family canine. There are several reports in the popular press that suggest that an animal, particularly a dog, can detect human infection, and it is hypothesized that the toe chewing was triggered by a wound infection. This case provides an opportunity to provide further education in caring for foot wounds in patients with spina bifida.

Podiatry Service, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC. Dr. Lovett is now with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Podiatry, Bethesda, MD. Dr. Duran is now with Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, CO.

Department of Clinical Investigation, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC. Dr. McKiernan is now with Medical Affairs, Defense Health Agency, Falls Church, VA.

The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. government.

Corresponding author: Cristóbal S. Berry-Cabán, PhD, Department of Clinical Investigation, Womack Army Medical Center, MCXC-DME-RES, Fort Bragg, NC 28310. (E-mail: cristobal.s.berry-caban.civ@mail.mil)