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A Pragmatic, Single-Center, Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial of Adjunct Hemoglobin-Mediated Granulox Topical Oxygen Therapy Twice Weekly for Foot Ulcers

Results of the Hemoglobin Application to Wounds Study

Leon Jonker PhD, Danielle Smith PhD, Emma Mark BSc, Sarah Thornthwaite BSc, Carol Gunn BSc (Pod), and Stacey Fisher MD
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Background

Achieving timely healing of foot ulcers can help avoid complications such as infection and amputation; topical oxygen therapy has shown promise in achieving this. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness of Granulox, a hemoglobin spray device designed to deliver oxygen to the surface of wounds, for the healing of foot ulcers.

Methods

We conducted a single-center, prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing standard of care (once-weekly podiatric medical clinic visits) versus standard care plus adjunct Granulox therapy twice weekly in adults with foot ulcers. After a 2-week screening phase, patients in whom the index wound had healed by less than 50% were randomized 1:1. Outcome measures were collated during the trial phase at 6 and 12 weeks.

Results

Of 79 patients enrolled, 38 were randomized. After 12 weeks, the median percentage wound size reduction compared with the size of the ulcer at the start of the trial phase was 100% for the control arm and 48% for the Granulox arm (P = .21, Mann-Whitney U test). In the former, eight of 14 foot ulcers had healed; in the latter, four of 15 (P = .14, Fisher exact test). In the control arm, two amputations and one withdrawal occurred, whereas in the Granulox arm, one unrelated death and five withdrawals were recorded.

Conclusions

We could not replicate the favorable healing associated with use of Granulox as published by others. Differences in wound chronicity and frequency of Granulox application might have influenced differences in study results. Granulox might perform best when used as an adjunct for treatment of chronic wounds at least 8 weeks old.

Department of Research and Development, Carleton Clinic, North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS, Carlisle, United Kingdom.

Department of Podiatry, Carleton Clinic, North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS, Carlisle, United Kingdom.

Corresponding author: Leon Jonker, PhD, Research and Development, Carleton Clinic, North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS, Carlisle, CA1 3SX, United Kingdom. (E-mail: leon.jonker@ncic.nhs.uk)

Conflict of interest: None reported.