• 1

    Ramkumar P, Farber J, Arnouk J, et al.: Injuries in a professional ballet dance company: a 10-year retrospective study. J Dance Med Sci 20: 8, 2016.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Goulart M, O'Malley M, Hodgkins C, et al.: Foot and ankle fractures in dancers. Clin Sports Med 27: 295, 2008.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3

    Caine D, Bergeron G, Goodwin B, et al.: A survey of injuries affecting pre-professional ballet dancers. J Dance Med Sci 20: 12, 2016.

  • 4

    Prakash A: Medical attention seeking dance injuries: systematic review of case reports. Phys Sportsmed 45: 64, 2016.

  • 5

    Garrick JG, Requa R: Ballet injuries: an analysis of epidemiology and financial outcome. Am J Sports Med 21: 586, 1993.

  • 6

    Russell JA: Breaking pointe: foot and ankle injuries in dance. Lower Extremity Rev January: 2012.

  • 7

    Lin C-F, Lee W-C, Chen Y-A, et al.: Fatigue-induced changes in movement pattern and muscle activity during ballet releve on demi-pointe. J Appl Biomech 350: 350, 2016.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8

    Kadel N: Foot and ankle problems in dancers. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am 25: 829, 2014.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    Smith T, Davies L, de Medici A, et al.: Prevalence and profile of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet dancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Phys Ther Sport 19: 6, 2016.

    • Crossref
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Prisk VR, O'Loughlin PF, Kennedy JG: Forefoot injuries in dancers. Clin Sports Med 27: 305, 2008.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Web of Science
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Strauss A, Corbin JM: Basics of Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techniques, Sage Publications Inc, Newbury Park, CA, 1990.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12

    Golafshani N: Understanding reliability and validity in qualitative research. Qual Rep 8: 597, 2003.

  • 13

    Tajet-Foxell B, Rose F: Pain and pain tolerance in professional ballet dancers. Br J Sports Med 29: 31, 1995.

  • 14

    Lai R, Krasnow D, Thomas M: Communication between medical practitioners and dancers. J Dance Med Sci 12: 47, 2008.

Qualitative Analysis of Risk Factors and Foot and Ankle Injuries in Ballet Dancers

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC.
  • | 2 Division of Podiatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, MA; Clinical Fellow in Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
  • | 3 Department of Plastics Surgery, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC.
  • | 4 Department of Podiatric Surgery, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Tucson, AZ.
  • | 5 Western University of Health Science, Pomona, CA.
Restricted access

Background: Ballet dancers are exposed to high rates of foot and ankle injury. Nevertheless, there have been limited efforts to capture their perspectives regarding risk of injury, treatment compliance, and prevention. The purpose of this study was to portray the perspectives of ballet dancers collected through organized focus group discussions.

Methods: Seven focus group sessions were conducted, with 47 ballet dancers participating. The conversation was directed to consider a variety of factors related to injury, both direct and remote. Transcripts from these focus groups were coded into ten major themes: internal pressure, external pressure, ballet milestones, seeking treatment, treatment compliance, targeted treatment, return to dance, nondance activities, physical fatigue, and activity preparation.

Results: It was found that participants returned to dancing prematurely after injury, faced significant internal and external pressure, lacked adherence to suggested treatment, and identified provider communication as lacking.

Conclusions: The results of this study can help with efforts to reduce injuries, encourage treatment compliance, and improve injury prevention. Future studies might consider the effectiveness of specific interventional approaches.

Corresponding author: Bryanna Vesely, DPM, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, 2772 Alameda Dr, Virginia Beach, VA 23456. (E-mail: bdvesely@wakehealth.edu)