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The Use of Patient Simulations to Teach and Assess Clinical Competencies in Colleges of Podiatric Medicine: A Survey of US Podiatric Medical Schools

Anthony ErrichettiNational Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners, Conshohocken, PA.

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Robert EcklesNew York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY.

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Judith BetoAcademy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Chicago, IL.

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Gretta A. GrossNational Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners, Conshohocken, PA.

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Amy E. LorionNational Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners, Conshohocken, PA.

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Human and mechanical simulations are used to teach and assess clinical competencies in medical education. In 2014, the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners implemented the Clinical Skills Patient Encounter, an examination using standardized patients. Similar clinical skills examinations already existed as part of medical and osteopathic licensure examinations. The purpose of this study was to assess the use of simulation-based education in the nine colleges of podiatric medicine in the United States to inform podiatric clinical faculty and other stakeholders about current trends within the podiatric education system. In 2019, the Clinical Skills Patient Encounter committee of the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners developed a survey and contacted each podiatric school to voluntarily participate. The mailed survey instrument gathered information on patient simulation modalities, years used, clinical content application, simulation program administration, facilities and equipment available, and the role of simulation educators. All nine schools participated anonymously. The survey showed that simulation modalities were used in all of the schools during the first 3 years, although there was considerable variance in their use.

Corresponding author: Anthony Errichetti, PhD, National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners, 101 W Elm St, Ste 150 Conshohocken, PA 19428. (E-mail: aerrichetti@nbome.org)