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Staged Treatment for Unstable Open Fracture-Dislocation of the Ankle: A Case Report

Jin Park MD, PhD1, Hyo Beom Lee MD1, Gab Lae Kim MD1, and Kyu Hyun Yang MD, PhD2
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  • 1 Hallym University, Kangdonggu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 Yonsei University, Kangnamgu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
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Unstable fracture-dislocation of the ankle is a common lower-extremity injury. Treatment is challenging when the fracture-dislocation is open and cannot be treated with conventional open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Immediate ORIF may not be possible for severe, unstable ankle injuries, such as those with ischemic foot because of a poor blood supply caused by soft-tissue injury, or open fracture-dislocation of the ankle with a deltoid ligament rupture. We describe a staged treatment for unstable open fracture-dislocation of the ankle with a deltoid ligament rupture. The first stage involves temporary vertical transarticular pinning combined with external fixation. The second stage involves delayed definitive plating with autogenous bone graft for the bone defect of the distal fibula. This staged management is useful in select emergency cases of unstable open fracture-dislocations of the ankle combined with deltoid ligament rupture for which conventional ORIF cannot be performed.

Corresponding author: Jin Park, MD, PhD, Hallym University, 150 Sung-an-ro, Kangdonggu, Seoul 05355, Republic of Korea. (E-mail: parkjinos@gmail.com)