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A Technical Review of Foot Temperature Measurement Systems

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  • 1 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
  • | 2 Centre of Biomedical Cybernetics, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
  • | 3 Faculty of Engineering, University of Malta, Msida, Malta. Dr. Falzon is now with Centre of Biomedical Cybernetics, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
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People suffering from diabetes are at risk of developing foot ulcerations which, if left untreated, could also lead to amputation. Monitoring of the foot temperature can help in the prevention of these foot complications, and various studies have shown that elevated temperatures may be indicative of ulceration. Over the years, there have been various devices that were designed for foot temperature monitoring, for both clinical and home use. The technologies used included infrared thermometry, liquid crystal thermography, infrared thermography, and a vast range of analogue and digital temperature sensors incorporated into different measurement platforms. All these systems are able to collect thermal data from the foot, with some being able to acquire data only when the foot is stationary and others being able to acquire data from the foot in motion, which can give more in-depth insight into any emerging problems. The aim of this review is to evaluate the available literature related to the technologies used in these systems, outlining the benefits of each and what further developments may be required to make the foot temperature analysis more effective.

Corresponding author: Stephen Mizzi, PhD, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, MSD2080, Malta. (E-mail: stephen.mizzi@um.edu.mt)