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A 30-Year-Old Man with an Unusually Large Untreated Plantar Fibrolipoma That Disrupted Ambulation and Required Operative Excision

Rock CJay PositanoHospital for Special Surgery, Non-surgical Foot and Ankle Service, New York, NY.

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 DPM, MPH
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Michael J. TrepalNew York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY.

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Michael CiaramellaHospital for Special Surgery, Non-surgical Foot and Ankle Service, New York, NY.

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Rock G. PositanoNon-Surgical Foot and Ankle Service, Joe DiMaggio Heel Pain Center, Hospital for Special Surgery, NY, NY; Yale School of Public Health, New Haven CT.

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A 30-year-old man working as a waiter presented with a progressively enlarging and symptomatic soft-tissue mass on the plantar medial aspect of his left foot. The mass was painful and disrupting ambulation, despite footwear modifications. He ultimately underwent excision of what was a determined to be a fibrolipoma, returning to his regular shoes and all activities. Plantar neoplasms, even when benign, can grow to sizes that can result in significant disability. If left untreated, particularly in individuals engaged in occupations requiring frequent standing or walking, excision of the mass will often require a more aggressive operative approach.

Corresponding author: Rock CJay Positano, DPM, Hospital for Special Surgery, Non-surgical Foot and Ankle Service, 519 E 72nd St, New York, NY 10021. (E-mail: positanorc@hss.edu)