Nail dust aerosols from onychomycotic toenails. Part II. Clinical and serologic aspects. 1984

C AbramsonPennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia 19107.

Search for other papers by C Abramson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
J WiltonPennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia 19107.

Search for other papers by J Wilton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

The podiatric procedure of burring hyperkeratotic fungal infected toenails results in large quantities of nail dust aerosols. An extremely large percentage (31%) of podiatrists who were analyzed for immunoglobulin E (IgE) by antibody radioimmunoassay were found to have abnormally high levels. Incidence of precipitin antibodies to Trichophyton rubrum in sera of those in practice from 0 to 15 years was 23%, and those in practice 16 years or more was 29%. In this study, podiatrists who were chronically exposed to nail dust aerosols after years of practice presented with symptoms of conjunctivitis, rhinitis, asthma, coughing, hypersensitivity, and impaired lung function.