Giant cell tumor of the intermediate cuneiform. A case report

EC Dunn Kern Hospital for Special Surgery, Warren, MI 48091.

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G Mauro Kern Hospital for Special Surgery, Warren, MI 48091.

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R Cohen Kern Hospital for Special Surgery, Warren, MI 48091.

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Although it has yet to be determined which surgical procedure provides the least chance for recurrence, surgical treatment remains the preferred therapy for giant cell tumors of bone. Few cases of giant cell tumor of the tarsus have been reported in the literature, with less than 10 of these cases occurring in the cuneiforms. When the extent of the tumor is questionable, definitive radiologic techniques should be used to aid in the selection of the most appropriate surgical procedure. Follow-up radiographic examination is critical to ensure that the patient remains tumor free. Yearly chest x-rays are recommended to rule out pulmonary metastasis. Although giant cell tumors represent only 5% to 8% of all benign primary osseous neoplasms of the foot, they have the potential to undergo malignant transformation, increasing the morbidity and mortality to the patient. Giant cell tumors of bone are locally aggressive, often occurring adjacent to articular surfaces, and usually are large when diagnosed. It is essential for the surgeon to plan a treatment that not only minimizes the chance of recurrence, but also attempts to preserve function of the involved part.

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