Conservative treatment of plantar fasciitis. A prospective study

DM LynchDepartment of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, USA.

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WP GoforthDepartment of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, USA.

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JE MartinDepartment of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, USA.

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RD OdomDepartment of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, USA.

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CK PreeceDepartment of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, USA.

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MW KotterDepartment of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, USA.

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A randomized, prospective study was conducted to compare the individual effectiveness of three types of conservative therapy in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. One hundred three subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment categories: anti-inflammatory, accommodative, or mechanical. Subjects were treated for 3 months, with follow-up visits at 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks. For the 85 patients who completed the study, a statistically significant difference was noted between groups, with mechanical treatment with taping and orthoses proving to be more effective than either anti-inflammatory or accommodative modalities.