The demography of limb dominance, body-mass index, and metatarsus adductus deformity

JR MontagueBarry University School of Natural and Health Sciences, Miami Shores, FL 33161-6695, USA.

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M BovarnickBarry University School of Natural and Health Sciences, Miami Shores, FL 33161-6695, USA.

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SC EffrenBarry University School of Natural and Health Sciences, Miami Shores, FL 33161-6695, USA.

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CC SoutherlandBarry University School of Natural and Health Sciences, Miami Shores, FL 33161-6695, USA.

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To test the null hypothesis that limb dominance (laterality) and side of complaint are not associated in a diverse population, nearly 400 patients (40% male, 60% female) of varying age and body size from three South Florida podiatric medical teaching facilities were surveyed in 1995-1996. Radiographs of feet were available for 15% of the patients, and the metatarsus adductus angle was measured on each x-ray. The typical patient was a women (median age, 49 years) of average body weight and average body-mass index. No statistical association was found between laterality and side of complaint in the broader sample, although a significant association did appear in the subsample of patients with bilateral x-rays. The prevalence of metatarsus adductus deformity (metatarsus adductus angle > 15 degrees) among patients with x-rays was 62%. No sex-specific, age-specific, or body size-specific associations were found between handedness and metatarsus adductus deformity.