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Attrition in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery Residency

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Background

The objective of this study was to investigate the rate of attrition within podiatric medicine and surgery residency training programs.

Methods

Between the academic years 2006–2007 and 2015–2016, the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine matched 780 graduates into 163 different residency training programs. Program directors from these sites were individually contacted by e-mail and asked whether the specific Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine graduates who originally matched with their program 1) completed the program, 2) transferred to another program, 3) quit the program, or 4) were fired from the program.

Results

Results were returned with respect to 614 (78.7%) of the 780 graduates, representing 103 (63.2%) of the 163 training programs. Program directors reported that 573 (93.3%) of the 614 graduates completed the program, 17 (2.8%) transferred from the program, six (1.0%) quit the program, five (0.8%) were fired by the program, and 13 (2.1%) matched but never started the program. This equates to an annual attrition rate of 0.46% for residents who started the podiatric residency training program that they matched with.

Conclusions

We conclude that the rate of attrition in podiatric medicine and surgery residency training appears to be relatively low or at least in line with other medical specialties, and hope that this information leads to other investigations examining attrition, specifically as it relates to physician-specific and program-specific risk factors for attrition.

Department of Podiatric Surgery, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.

Corresponding author: Andrew J. Meyr, DPM, Department of Podiatric Surgery, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, 8th at Race St, Philadelphia, PA 19107. (E-mail: ajmeyr@gmail.com)