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Saphenous Nerve Denervation for Chronic Pain After Compartment Syndrome of the Foot

A Case Report

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Denervation has been a recommended treatment option for a range of pathologies, including relief from chronic pain; however, literature discussing complete denervation of the distal saphenous nerve for foot pain has not been found. A case report of surgical decompression for compartment syndrome resulting in chronic, debilitating foot pain that was successfully alleviated by complete saphenous nerve denervation is presented. The predominant area of the patient's pain was on the medial aspect of the foot, where a thickened scar from a decompression fasciotomy was noted. The patient's initial pain score was reported as 10 of 10, with no relief from numerous conservative treatments attempted over an 11-year period. After a diagnostic injection of a local anesthetic to the distal saphenous nerve provided the patient with immediate, temporary relief, complete denervation of the distal saphenous nerve was performed. The patient reported significant pain reduction shortly after the procedure. This case suggests that physicians should be cognizant of the saphenous nerve and its branches, as well as its variable pathways during surgery. In addition, practitioners should be aware of its influence as a progenitor of pain in the foot that may require denervation.

Friendly Foot Care PC, Crown Point, IN.

Barry University, Miami, FL. Dr. Ansert is now with St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester, MA.

Corresponding author: Michael S. Nirenberg, DPM, Friendly Foot Care PC, 50 W 94th Pl, Crown Point, IN 46307. (E-mail: info@friendlyfootcare.com)

Conflict of Interest: None reported.