Micronized Dehydrated Amnion Chorion Membrane (mdHACM) Injection in the Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendinitis: A Large Retrospective Case Series

Jay Spector
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Brandon Hubbs
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Kimberly Kot
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Niki Istwan
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David Mason
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Background: Human amniotic membrane contains growth factors and cytokines, which promote epithelial cell migration and proliferation, stimulate metabolic processes leading to collagen synthesis, and attract fibroblasts, while also reducing pain and inflammation. Randomized studies have shown that micronized dehydrated human amnion chorion membrane (mdHACM) allograft injection is an effective treatment for plantar fasciitis. Our objective is to present our experience with using mdHACM injection as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy and report short term treatment outcomes. Methods: Included in this retrospective case series were patients diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy treated with mdHACM by a single physician were identified from an electronic medical record system. Included for analysis were those with at least 2 follow up visits within 45 days of mdHACM injection. Outcomes examined included change in reported level of pain during the 45-day observation period and adverse events associated with treatment. Results: Follow-up data were available for 32 mdHACM-treated patients and abstracted from the electronic medical record. At treatment initiation 97% of patients reported severe (66%) or moderate (31%) pain. At first follow-up visit (mean 8.1 {plus minus} 2.7 days after injection), 84% (27/32) had reported improvement in pain levels, although 37% of patients continued to report severe (6%) or moderate (31%) pain. At the second follow-up visit (mean 23.1 {plus minus} 6.2 days after injection), no patients reported severe pain and one reported moderate pain. Within 45 days of mdHACM injection complete resolution of symptoms was reported by 66% of treated patients (n=21) with the remaining 34% reporting improvement but not complete resolution (n=11) of their symptoms. Two patients reported calf or quadricep pain or tightness post-injection. Conclusions: In a single practice mdHACM injection reduced or eliminated pain in all patients where follow-up data was available.

Corresponding Author; email: dmason@mimedx.com