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Perceived Stress and Coffee and Energy Drink Consumption Predict Poor Sleep Quality in Podiatric Medical Students

A Cross-sectional Study

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  • 1 Department of Pre-clinical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY.
  • | 2 Department of Health and Medical Sciences, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical and Molecular Biomedicine, Psychiatry Unit, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
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Background

A cross-sectional survey administered to first- and second-year podiatric medical students aimed to investigate the effect of coffee intake, energy drink consumption, and perceived stress on sleep quality in medical students during their preclinical studies.

Methods

Ninety-eight of 183 students contacted (53.6%) completed a questionnaire comprising standard instruments measuring sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness scale), and perceived stress (ten-item Perceived Stress Scale). Furthermore, we investigated coffee and energy drink consumption. Logistic regression was conducted to identify factors associated with poor sleep quality and the relation between sleep quality and academic performance (grade point average).

Results

High prevalences of poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, and perceived stress were reported. In addition, higher odds of developing poor sleep quality were associated with coffee and energy drink intake, perceived stress, and excessive daytime sleepiness. The total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score was inversely correlated with grade point average.

Conclusions

First- and second-year podiatric medical students have poor sleep quality. Further research is needed to identify effective strategies to reduce stress and decrease coffee and energy drink intake to minimize their negative effect on sleep quality and academic performance in podiatric medical students.

Corresponding author: Fortunato Battaglia, MD, PhD, Department of Health and Medical Sciences, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Ave, South Orange, NJ 07079. (E-mail: fortunato.battaglia@shu.edu)